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NPPA Files Comments As Part of News Media Coalition Regarding FAA Drone Registration

November 7th, 2015 by Mickey Osterreicher and tagged , , , , ,

In response to a Request for Information from the FAA, the NPPA, as part of a News Media Coalition (NMC) filed Comments on November 6, 2015, regarding Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) registration,

According to Charles D. Tobin of Holland & Knight, LLP on behalf of the 17 news organizations and associations, “the News Media Coalition has stressed, and the government has acknowledged, that the First Amendment rights of the public in receiving news and information in the public interest, and the media in gathering that news and information, must be preserved in the regulation of any new technology, including UAS.”

With that overriding principle in mind the NMC went on to “strongly urge the FAA to require registration at the point-of-sale with registration information submitted by the seller, rather than the end-users,” to avoid an overly burdensome and costly process.

The coalition also advised that the  “FAA should only require the submission of the limited contact information from users necessary to ensure accountability” and “to avoid unnecessary administrative burdens and bureaucratic delays, registration should be web-based [with] information about the registration should be available in an easy-to-use and searchable online database that provides access consistent with that provided by the FAA for other aircraft registration.”

Additionally, “operation of UAS should be permitted upon submission of registration information, rather than awaiting affirmative approval or imposing a waiting period before a UAS may be legally operated. Any delay or additional affirmative steps could restrict an otherwise qualified UAS operator from exercising her First Amendment rights” and that “there should not be any fees—for users or sellers—to file UAS registrations with the FAA.

The group went on express its concern about registration requirements that operators file detailed flight plans with the FAA because it “would not meaningfully contribute to safety “make it virtually impossible to use UAS for breaking news stories.”

Should the FAA adopt special rules for micro UAS (under 2.2 lbs.) the group believes they should be exempt from registration requirements because “collection of such information would be overly burdensome to users and to the FAA and, given micro UAS operational limitations and safety benefits.”

Finally, in order to encourage accountability and responsible use of UAS, the NMC urged the FAA to expedite a clear commonsense final small UAS rule and utilize stakeholders (such as those in the coalition) to “help better educate UAS operators, including hobbyists, regarding current regulations and best practices for safe UAS operation.”

Members of the News Media Coalition include: Advance Publications, Inc., A.H. Belo Corp., American Broadcasting Companies, Inc., The Associated Press, Capitol Broadcasting Co., Cox Media Group, LLC, Fusion Media Network, LLC, Gannett Co., Inc., Getty Images (US), Inc., National Press Photographers Association, NBCUniversal Media, LLC, The New York Times Company, Reuters, The E.W. Scripps Company, Sinclair Broadcast Group, Inc., TEGNA, Inc., and WP Company LLC.

Posted in drone, Drones, FAA, First Amendment, First Amendment rights, Getty Images, National Press Photographers Association, New York TImes, News Photography, Newsgathering, NPPA, small unmanned aerial systems, sUAS, UAS, Washington Post | No Comments »

In AFP v Morel Judge Denies Attorney Fees to Morel Trial Lawyers, Grants Lien by Former Lawyer

March 24th, 2015 by and tagged , , , , , ,

******************* UPDATE 03-24-15 ***********

In a surprise decision the trial court judge in the case denied Morel’s application for attorneys’ fees for his trial lawyers but granted the motion by his prior lawyer for her charging lien. “Briefly stated, Morel fought a fair fight and won. The fact that this was a close case on the merits, involving novel legal issues, persuades the Court that the purposes of the Copyright Act are not furthered by awarding fees and costs pursuant to § 505.”  Read decision AFP v Morel – attorneys fees 03-23-15

 

*************** UPDATE 10-05-14 ***************

On October 3, 2014, Morel’s lawyers filed a Memorandum of Law in Support of Daniel Morel’s Motion for an Award of Attorneys Fees and Costs against. Attorney Joseph T. Baio argued that as the prevailing party where the Court had already affirmed the damages that the jury had awarded, Mr. Morel is entitled to more than $2.3 million in fees and another approximately $200 in expenses. Additionally Mr. Morel’s previous attorney, Barbara Hoffman is seeking more than $700K in fees for her part of the case.  orm of a new trial on all issues.”

*************** UPDATE 01-29-14 ***************

On January 24, 2014 Morel’s lawyers filed a Memorandum of Law in Opposition to Defendants’ Motion for a Judgment as a Matter of Law. Attorney Joseph T. Baio argued that the court should stop AFP/Getty’s “continuing four-year war of attrition against Mr. Morel” and  deny their request “to eradicate the jury’s findings across the board, slash the amounts they must pay Mr. Morel, or order a ‘do-over’ in the form of a new trial on all issues.”

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Getty Images and Agency France-Presse have filed documents requesting a landmark copyright infringement verdict rendered against the media giants be overturned.

In the motion challenging the verdict, AFP and Getty’s lawyers claim, among other things, that no reasonable jury could have found that their clients willfully committed infringement.  The motion also disputes the jury’s allocation of actual damages (damages directly traceable to the copyright infringement) claiming the $275,000 was excessive and not supported by sufficient evidence.  AFP and Getty are seeking a reduction in damages or a new trial so the issue can be reheard.

Last November a jury essentially threw the book at Getty and AFP, awarding photographer Daniel Morel $1.22 million in damages on a claim arising from the media groups’ unauthorized use of Morel’s photos of the aftermath of the 2010 Haitian earthquake.

The case arose after Getty and AFP used images Morel posted to Twitter.  The groups falsely credited another user who had reposted the photos and claimed to own them. The damages awarded are the maximum allowed, increasing the impact of a case that had already captured the public’s attention as a test of the law’s treatment of intellectual property shared on social media.

Getty and AFP claimed that Twitter’s terms of service allowed supported their use of Morel’s photographs.  AFP went as far as to file suit against Morel, arguing that he was interfering with their business practices.

In 2011 a federal district court judge dismissed AFP’s claim and ruled that it, as well as Getty, had infringed on Morel’s copyright by publishing the photos without his permission, and the decision was heralded as a major victory for photographers who share content on the Internet. It was then up to a jury to decide the appropriate damages, that determination in part being premised on whether or not the group’s copyright infringement had been “willful”.

 

Posted in AFP, AFP v Morel, Agence France-Presse, Daniel Morel, Digital Millenium Copyright Act, Getty, Getty Images, Lawsuit, Legal, National Press Photographers Association, News Photography, NPPA, photographers, Photographers' Rights, photojournalism, Twitpic, Twitter | No Comments »

Photographers vs. NFL, AP & Getty: 2nd and 7

December 20th, 2013 by Mickey Osterreicher and tagged , , , ,

*********UPDATE****************

U.S. District Judge Robert W. Sweet ruled on August 13, 2015 that the photographers must amend their complaint prior to appealing the dismissal of their copyright claims to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. The court declined to enter a final judgment in the matter, which it had dismissed last March, finding that the plaintiffs may replead their case and that a revised contract claim on the licensing agreements might avoid the need for a Second Circuit review.

“The plaintiffs indicate in their briefing that they intend to argue that the contracts ‘were invalid and unenforceable due to duress, coercion, unconscionability, and fraud’ and the court’s March 27 Order indicates that the argument may have significant merit,” Judge Sweet wrote. “A finding in the plaintiffs’ favor on their contract claims in the district court would thus significantly alter — or perhaps moot — their copyright claims in the Court of Appeals, rendering certification improper.”

In his ruling Judge Sweet noted that to preserve their copyright issue for appeal, the plaintiffs should “simply restate their copyright claims in their new complaint,” which could later be presented to the Second Circuit at the appropriate time. The court also granted a motion by Getty Images to compel arbitration of contract, copyright and antitrust claims which the plaintiffs are now pursuing.

In March the court granted the plaintiffs 20 days to file a new complaint and then approved a three-week extension for the amended pleadings to be filed. Then in May, the defendants claimed the photographers had missed that deadline and the case should finally be dismissed. But the judge disagreed, finding “the plaintiffs’ diligence in this case has been more than adequate, particularly as they have represented that they are prepared to file their second amended complaint within 48 hours of this motion’s resolution.

********* UPDATE ***************

U.S. District Judge Robert W. Sweet dismissed the lawsuit in a 129 page redacted Opinion finding that agreements between the NFL and AP along with Getty that allow the NFL to use photos royalty-free are not anticompetitive, writing “plaintiffs have failed to allege a plausible product market limited to NFL-related photographs at this juncture.”  He also found that  the photographers lacked standing and are barred from suing under antitrust laws “because their injuries are too secondary and indirect.” The judge also rejected the photographers’ claim that they “directly compete” with Getty and AP. “Plaintiffs are neither consumers nor competitors in the alleged market for commercial licensing of NFL-related photographs,” Judge Sweet wrote. “Indeed, the [amended complaint] clearly states that plaintiffs have always licensed the photos that they shot ‘on spec’ through third-party licensing agents . . . as such, Plaintiffs argument on this point must fail.”

The court also found that “while each Plaintiff retains copyright in his photos, he provides a broad copyright license to AP in all of his photos that are not rejected by AP.” Such a license allows the AP to “copy, disseminate and otherwise use” those photos. The judge noted that while their agreement requires AP to pay a royalty when it licenses the use of the photographers photos, it does not require that any royalty be paid where the AP receives no licensing fees itself. “the AP Contributor Agreements do not require AP to license the contributors’ photographs to third parties only through a ‘sale’ that would generate revenue and therefore royalties.” Judge Sweet wrote. “Nothing in the AP Contributor Agreements requires AP to issue only royalty-bearing sublicenses.”

The judge also dismissed the photographers’ copyright claims against the NFL because the agreement provided the AP with a valid license to use their images.

************************************************

In October seven photographers filed a copyright infringement lawsuit against the NFL, Getty Images and the Associated Press. This week the defendants responded with a motion to dismiss. The plaintiffs are Paul Spinelli, Scott Boehm, George Newman Lowrance, David Stluka, Paul Jasienski, David Drapkin and Thomas E. Witte.  They claim, among other things, that if they wished to continue licensing their NFL images for commercial uses, “they were forced to transition their NFL content from Getty Images to AP who had the contract with the NFL.” In turn, the complaint alleged that “Getty Images threatened to remove Plaintiffs’ other sports content from its distribution networks and/or terminate its relationship with Plaintiffs entirely if they did not agree to continue licensing their NFL content through Getty Images even after the expiration of its commercial licensing deal with the NFL.” The complaint stated “Getty Images also made clear that it would not ‘welcome back’ any contributors who moved their NFL content to AP should Getty Images ever regain the exclusive rights to license NFL content in the future.” 

The photographers also viewed Getty’s threats as “a blatant attempt to leverage its exclusive licensing agreement with MLB and other sports entities in order to force Plaintiffs to leave their NFL content with Getty Images” and “Because certain Plaintiffs had significant non-NFL content at Getty Images, including significant MLB photo collections, Getty Images’ position forced Plaintiffs to make an impossible choice between losing commercial licensing opportunities for their NFL content by not going to AP or giving up commercial licensing opportunities for their non-NFL content by leaving Getty Images.”

In its motion to dismiss the NFL claimed that the use of the photos “was fully within the scope of” its licensing agreements the AP  and Getty. AP claims in its motion to dismiss the lawsuit that the contracts it made with the photographers “licensed AP to make the uses of plaintiffs’ photographs” and also “authorized AP to issue sublicenses” to the NFL and others. In its motion, Getty also sought to dismiss the case and to “compel arbitration or in the alternative to stay the action.” Getty claims that its agreement with the photographers requires that they “arbitrate their disputes” and that the case should be put on hold “pending final resolution of the arbitration” in the event that the court does not grant the motion to dismiss.

Read the filed complaint here.

Posted in AP, copyright, copyright infringement, Getty Images, Motion to Dismiss, NFL, Photographers' Rights | No Comments »