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NPPA Voices Strong Objections to Congressional Incident in Cincinnati

August 25th, 2011 by Mickey Osterreicher

NPPA has written strong letters of objection to both U.S. Rep. Steve Chabot (R-Ohio)  and the Cincinnati Police Chief after video cameras belonging to citizens were seized by a police officer acting upon orders from the congressman’s aides.

The incident occurred on August 22, 2011 while Chabot was speaking to the public at a town hall meeting. According to press reports, Chabot spokesman Jamie Schwartz admitted that “he had a Cincinnati police officer confiscate the cameras ‘to protect the privacy of constituents.’”

Think Progress also reported that signs were posted on doors at the NorthAvondale Recreation Center that read: “For Security Purposes, Cameras Are NOT Permitted.”  Video posted on Carlos Miller’s website shows clips of the incident. At least two photographers recording with broadcast quality cameras can be seen in the video although they were not interefered with.

What is most disconcerting is that Congressman Chabot sits on the U.S. House of Representatives Commitee on the Judiciary which deals with these very issues and has supported legislation permitting “the photographing, electronic recording, broadcasting, or televising to the public of [federal] court proceedings. In seeking “a complete and immediate apology” by the congressman for this  “blatant constitutional transgression” the NPPA letter also wrote that “posting signs banning cameras ‘for security purposes’ does not supersede the constitutional rights of citizens.”

Reaction to the incident has been extremely negative and widespread with hundreds of comments posted on YouTube, Congressman Chabot’s Facebook wall and sent to his congresssional website page. This appears to be exactly the embarrassing outcome that aides had intented to avoid. Schwartz also is reported to have said that the cameras confiscated “from David Little and Liz Ping, who were given the cameras back at the end of the meeting.”

The NPPA letter to Cincinnati Police Chief James E. Craig stated that “whether the officer acted at the request of the congressman or his staff or of his own volition exhibits a total lack of understanding and/or disregard for the constitutional protections afforded those he is sworn to serve and protect. Law enforcement agencies are established to uphold and enforce laws in a professional manner, part of which is to exercise good judgment. I believe that your officer abused that discretion by his actions.” The letter also went on to state that “if your department’s vision is to be ‘recognized as the standard of excellence in policing’ by ‘the delivery of fair and impartial police services while maintaining an atmosphere of respect for human dignity;’ then we would respectfully request that you maintain your ‘integrity,’ ‘professionalism,’ and ‘accountability’ by upholding your ‘obligations to the department and community’ and reinstate ‘public trust’ by a full and impartial investigation of this incident.” The letter concluded by a “request that your department immediately issue orders directing officers to cease such activity and also that your department implement revised training for all officers regarding these matters.”

Another town hall meeting is scheduled for August 29, 2011. Schwartz assured reporters that “no cameras would be seized at” that meeting.

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Top_News/US/2011/08/24/Video-cameras-confiscated-at-town-hall/UPI-46281314241497/#ixzz1W3ygwoJo

 and http://www.pixiq.com/article/ohio-congressman-bans-cameras-from-town-hall-meeting

Posted in Access, Cameras, cincinnati police, condemned, confiscated, congressman, ethics, First Amendment, First Amendment rights, Fourth Amendment, Fourth Amendment rights, law, Legal, mass media, National Press Photographers Association, News Photography, NPPA, photographers, Photographers' Rights, Police, Politics, Public Photography, Search and Seizure, steve chabot, Town Hall Meeting, video cameras, violating | 1 Comment »

Photojournalist Kidnapped and Executed in Mexico

March 30th, 2011 by Alicia Calzada and tagged , , , , , ,

A photojournalist for La Prensa, in Monclova was kidnapped and murdered in Monterrey last week, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. The organization reports that Luis Emanuel Ruiz Carrillo was abducted on Thursday night along with two others, and found dead with a gunshot wound to the head on Friday.

As the world is focused on the uprisings in the Arab World, let’s not forget that one of the most dangerous places for journalists is next door, for some of us, mere hours away. Our brave brethren in Mexico deserve our respect and support.

According to the Associated Press, some of Mexico’s largest news outlets recently agreed to a set of drug-war reporting guidelines, agreeing to ignore propaganda messages from drug gangs, which are sometimes left near the bodies of victims. In my opinion, the U.S. media should follow suit.

Posted in ethics, photographers, photojournalism | No Comments »

When to use graphic photos from BP oil spill

June 9th, 2010 by Alicia Calzada

“Al’s Morning Meeting” has an interesting piece about what editors should think about when using graphic photos depicting birds in distress as a result of the BP oil spill. While there are no privacy concerns regarding the birds Al Tompkins writes that a big issue here is the use of readers submitted photos, and assessing their genuineness.

Posted in ethics | No Comments »

Law and Ethics in Multimedia– panel discussion video available

May 20th, 2010 by Alicia Calzada and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The legendary Multimedia Immersion Workshop had a great panel on ethics and legal issues a couple of days ago. The best part, for those of us who weren’t able to make it to Syracuse, is that the entire discussion is available online. The panelists were an extraordinary group of experts, including Mickey H. Osterreicher (NPPA general counsel), along with panelists Barbara Fought, Roy Gutterman, Evan Vucci, and Will Sullivan.

The panelists debunked the myth of the 30-second rule regarding the use of music as well as clarifying many other legal issues for photographers. Issues addressed included: using music in multimedia presentation; licensing; using your images in a portfolio; shield law; trespass; commercial use vs. journalism; copyright issues; access; creative commons; and important contemporary cases.

Follow this link, and click on the box below that says “Immersion Ethics Panel, May 18, 2010.” (forgive the commercials, I will see if I can’t get a clean download version).

Posted in copyright, ethics, law, Legal, photographers, photojournalism, students | No Comments »